What Can We Expect and Do to Fight Tory Persecution?

Comment

How to... Living with an Illness ME Personal Blog Random Rants Writing about Illness

What Can We Expect and Do to Fight Tory Persecution

Last week on election night when I saw the results of the exit polls I felt such despair and grief I cried and cried. The darkness was so profound that I could not even bring myself to talk about it. What made it worse was the fact that I was not alone and when I looked at the tweets of other ME sufferers, they too were feeling exactly the same, in fact some people even feared for their lives. That may seem like some extreme hyperbole but I can assure you, they have good reason to feel that way. So here, finally, are my thoughts on the election results. We are ME sufferers, what can we expect and do to fight Tory persecution? I’m going to tell you.

I don’t really get involved in politics. What I mean by this is that while I have firm political beliefs and ideologies, it’s not something I choose to write about. So I didn’t discuss anything relating to the elections in my various posts and maybe I should have. In fact, in the run up to the election, I was more interested in May being ME Awareness month and I had planned to release a series of videos and articles to raise awareness of this illness. Despite my planning, I had to deal with a bout of food poisoning and then full blown flu in April, which I am still recovering from, so everything got delayed. But I made sure I had registered for my postal vote and I filled out the ballot paper and sent it off. It was a wasted vote because the Conservatives (whom I did not vote for) were assured a win in my area. Yet I still voted. I don’t want to discuss the reasons people should or should not vote or even the electoral system and the pros and cons of ‘First Past the Post’ or how this travesty was allowed to happen. These are things that are being discussed everywhere at the moment. I am more concerned with how the results of this election affect us as very ill people.

Why We’re Afraid

One of the very first things the coalition government did when it came into power 5yrs ago was to wage a war on the ill and disabled on benefits. We were all portrayed as lazy, scroungers and it was implied it was our fault that the country was in such economic dire straits. “We’re all in this together” we were told, while it was the most poor and most ill in society that were attacked. I don’t deny that economic reform is needed, but why start at the bottom? Why not start at the top? What kind of a government points the finger at the ill and poor instead of at the real culprits of the financial crash? I’m not naïve enough to say that things would have been much different under a Labour government, but the fact is that it was the previous coalition that came after us with a vengeance.

Here are just some facts about harmful changes that government has made:

  • The Under Occupancy Charge, also known as the ‘Bedroom Tax’, affects 660,000 families 63% of which have a disabled family member.
  • 33% of NHS Walk Ins, 66% A&E/Maternity Wards and 16% of all other types of A&Es have either been downgraded or closed. The Tories have overseen the worst A&E crisis in 11 years. Not since January 2004 have breaches of the A&E 4 hour target been as bad.
  • There are 477 fewer GP Surgeries, and a 4 fold increase in unfilled GP vacancies since 2010, partly caused by the £987mn real terms cut in GP funding. England’s GP to patient ratio has worsened by 3-4% as population increases. Of 27 EU Countries, the UK is ranked 24th for the number of working doctors it has per head of population (just 2.71 per 1,000 people).
  • They forced through a reorganisation of the NHS which has accelerated privatisation. Private Firms have been invited to bid for £18billion of NHS Contracts. Of contracts decided upon, private health have won 33%, 56% or 70% of those contracts depending on which statistic you place most stock in.
  • According to the UK Statistics Authority the government broke page 45 of their 2010 Manifesto to increase NHS Spending in real terms every year. According to the IFS, NHS Spending is falling 9.1% per patient from 2010 until 2018. The King’s Fund says the NHS is facing its tightest budget squeeze since 1979. And the Nuffield Trust said that NHS spending is falling steeply as a proportion of UK GDP.
  • Despite inheriting an NHS that enjoyed record satisfaction ratings, the coalition, by 2012, had delivered the largest every fall in patient satisfaction with the NHS.
  • A highly efficient NHS Direct has been shut down and replaced by a for-profit NHS111 service that botched its initial launch. 78% of the NHS111 staff who process 111 calls have no clinical expertise. This has caused all sorts of pressures, including additional admissions at A&E. It has been reported that there have been 22 deaths or serious injuries which were caused by failures in the launch of NHS 111.
  • S75 regulations, TTIP, and forced closures of A&Es take power away from the people and place it in the hands of unelected corporations. The government have insisted that healthcare will not be exempt from TTIP. They passed clauses to allow Jeremy Hunt to force NHS closures against the say of the local public, and diminish the court’s role in holding him accountable. He has also passed regulations to push commercial competition in the NHS much more forcefully. Needless to say, all of this is anti-democratic.
  • 9,746 Hospital Beds have been axed under the Tories. The UK now has one of the worst hospital bed to patient ratios in the world. 1,876 Mental Health NHS Beds have been cut and up to 4,000 Psychiatric Nurses have lost their job, and overall mental health provision has been cut by 25%.
  • The coalition ignored National Audit Office warnings that the Work Programme (which has twice been declared unlawful in a court of law) would fail and it failed to deliver jobs for 85%-91%% of participants according to the UK Statistics Authority. The Government’s £200 million Back to Work Scheme helps just 3% of the people it targeted said the National Audit Office.
  • After the coalition ordered private firms to toughen up the Work Capability Assessments, 158,000 were wrongly found fit to work , and had their decision overturned on appeal. 1,300 claimants died whilst being placed in the category to ready themselves for work. 68 claimants died while their appeal against the assessment finding them fit to work was still ongoing.

As I said, these are just some of the changes made by the coalition government; I detailed them here, because they have such an impact on ill people like us. I got these figures from ‘100 biggest failures of David Cameron’s Tories, May 2010 to Present’ and I would urge you to read the full list which gives so many details on detrimental changes to every aspect of our society along with links to evidence of where that information was attained.

Going Forward

David Cameron and his Conservative party now has a majority win and we know, for a fact that things are going to get worse. They have promised to make £12bn of welfare cuts. If they go ahead and do that, many people, not just the ill, will be hit hard. Things have gotten so bad for us in the last 5yrs and we are only assured that they will get worse. But we cannot give up; we have to keep fighting because for many of us it is a matter of survival. The most heart-breaking tweets that I read on Friday and over the weekend were written by ME sufferers who actually feared for their lives; they were not sure they would be able to survive another 5yrs. I have to admit that I am one of the lucky ones as I am not dependent on ESA or any disability benefits. I am well enough to be able to work on my writing, but my earnings are meagre and I survive on the generosity of family and friends. Not everyone has that luxury. I’ve been on Incapacity Benefit when I was truly too ill to work at all. The first sign that my symptoms let up, I went back to work and I had a major relapse which has resulted in me being unable to go out and get a ‘proper job’. I know dozens of ME sufferers and not a single one of them would take a penny from the state unless they really had no other option. More worrying are the changes to the NHS. The medical attention we require is not optional.

What Can We Do?

As ME sufferers we know all too well how our illness is regarded. We fight just to have ME recognised as a legitimate illness with doctors, let alone with those responsible for authorising benefits. People with more recognisable illnesses than ours are facing discrimination, and it doesn’t help that we’re expected to fight when most of us have our hands full just getting through the daily acts of feeding, washing and clothing ourselves. But we have no choice, we cannot allow anymore persecution. There are things that even the most ill sufferers can do.

Get and Provide Support

One of the worst aspects of this illness is the fact that we all feel extremely isolated as we do spend so much time in our homes alone. There is support available online. I have connected with hundreds of other sufferers on Twitter alone. This is important because it shows us that we are not alone. Personally, the anger I feel on my own, turns to complete outrage when I see so many people suffering. This might sound like a bad thing, but that outrage drives me to want to make a change. It shows me that I am part of a community of people and that with so many of us, there is something we can do. On my bad days, I really need that sense of community and understanding and I talk about what I am feeling and going through in large part in order to let others know that I understand what they are going through. So get and provide that sense of community and support by interacting with others as much as you can with other sufferers.

Get Your Story Out There

The media is very quick to make a huge show of the very small minority of benefit cheats and in How The Sun and Daily Mail Lie About CFS Cure Claims I looked at specific examples of how CFS was falsely portrayed in the press. We have to make our voices heard. We have to show the way that we are affected by our illness and the persecution of the state. We have to put faces to the horrors being I know, I know, we’re all ill and struggling, some of us so much more than others. But there are lots of ways that we can put a face to the horror and it is extremely important that we do. In fact tomorrow I am going to be publishing a more detailed list of things we can do to get our stories out there and the different actions we can take no matter what level the severity of symptoms.

Get Involved

Most of us can’t march through the streets with placards; we’re just not well enough! But there are others way to protest and fight for the things we want and need. You can sign up to organisations like ‘38 Degrees’ who are fighting to make the changes that we need. I have been a member for a while now and they have made significant changes. One campaign that I am particularly interested in is the Save Our NHS Campaign. You can choose to just sign petitions online, you can make phone calls for them if you feel well enough to do that, or if you or are a family member are more able, you can take part in organised protest marches. They also have details of local groups in your area that will be fighting to save your local NHS services. The e-mails they send out detail what needs doing where and even if you’re just able to send an e-mail to your MP, or share a story or campaign on social media to help get more people involved, you’re helping, as their past campaigns have shown.

Ask For Help

If you’re facing problems applying for benefits there are organisations that can help. I have friends who have successfully applied for or appealed unfair decisions for ESA and DLA using the guides and advice from Benefits and Work. It is not a free service (I have not used them personally, I do not work for them nor do I get paid for mentioning them here) and costs around £20 for a year’s subscription, but they do have a 7 day money back guarantee, so you can check them out and see if they can help. They’re an independent organisation and funded only by the subscriptions from their members. In their own words: “This complete independence means that Benefits and Work is free to publish information that makes it deeply unpopular with the Department for Work and Pensions, multinationals with an interest in benefits – such as Atos Healthcare, Unum Provident and Capita – and even other advice providers whose dependence on state and corporate funding may have made them reluctant to tell the whole truth.”

You don’t need to use this organisation, ask around online for what you need – there will definitely be at least one ME sufferer somewhere who has been through what you are going through and that will be able to offer a suggestion or advice.

It’s Not Over…

Yes, the election results were an awful blow and many of us have been licking our wounds these past few days. It would have been nice to even have a glimmer of hope that things would change but at least we know the beast we have to fight. We will fight because we really have no choice as the alternative is to die alone, poor, cold, ill and hungry. The elections may be over, but the fight to survive continues. I am the first person to admit that with our health struggles, even blinking hurts some days. We’re ME sufferers and we fight and struggle every day; we now have to translate that into some kind of positive change and we definitely will.

Can you think of anything else we can do to fight for our rights? Let us know in the comments below. Tomorrow I have a special post planned as it is ME Awareness Day, where I will tell you how you can help in the easiest and least taxing ways.

Original Image Credit and Terms of Use